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Saturday, December 19, 2015

Inner Discipline

Author Barbara Coloroso presents two philosophical stances essential to teaching Inner Discipline:

  1. Kids are worth it.
  2. If it works, and leaves a child and my own dignity intact, do it.
To read in full this fascinating article, click here.


A Call to All Teachers:


Proudly announcing our new group for educators worldwide, “We Teach the World.” Our aim is to connect teachers and related school personnel all over the world, so that we can share much-needed ideas, strategies, and lesson plans as well as all kinds of resources in classroom management and in student discipline. Coordinating our effort worldwide, we can tell each other where to find important resources and information. If you administer a teaching blog or have created educational resources to facilitate our job, you are welcome to share them here. As long as they contribute to education, we want to know of your business. Teachers with questions, post them here; mentors and seasoned teachers, your valuable experience and unique perspective matter to us, so make your voices heard. Because isolated, we teachers are imaginative, resourceful and resilient, but connected, connected we are imaginative, resourceful, resilient AND powerful. To join us, click on, “We Teach the World.”

Friday, December 11, 2015

Memory Strategies for Low-Achieving Students

These guidelines are from my 7-page article, Memory Strategies to Help Students Remember what they See and Hear in the Classroom. To read the complete article, click on the link at the bottom.

  1. Short memorizing rehearsals are more productive than longer ones. Make sure that each practice is no longer than 30 minutes at a time.
  2. It is better to have five weekly rehearsals of 30 minutes each than one longer weekly practice (e.g. three or more hours in a row).
  3. Memory improves when students use multiple sensory pathways to learn the material. For example, when students are learning visual material, they need to elaborate verbally on what they are seeing. On the other hand, if students are trying to consolidate verbal material, for example, from the history textbook, memorization is easier if they draw a diagram or write smaller bits of information on index cards that they can study visually.
  4. When the learning material is both meaningful and organized is always easier to remember. When studying, children need to use organization aids such as timelines, outlines, bullet lists, flowcharts, cause and effect diagrams, and/or comparing and contrasting diagrams.
  5. Practice children in highlighting, outlining, and summarizing important information.
  6. Students can remember definitions better if they use their own words and/or paraphrase, rather than trying to memorize exactly what the teacher said or what they read in the book.
  7. Memorization improves when students think of something that connects with the new information, and link the new concept, topic or theme to what they already know.
  8. Teach students to think of examples of what they are trying to remember. The more connections they make, the more details they add to the concept or topic, and the more examples they can think of, the better their chances of memorizing and learning the information.
  9. Teach students to group the information, placing similar items together. For example, from a grocery list with 23 items, the child creates the fruits group, the vegetables group, and the meats group. Students need to know how many items they need to remember (23) and how many groups of items are in the list (3). It is harder to remember 23 isolated items from the longer list, but the same items are easier to recall if we group them in three groups, e.g. eight meats, six vegetables, and nine fruits.
You can read the full article here.


A Call to All Teachers:


Proudly announcing our new group for educators worldwide, “We Teach the World.” Our aim is to connect teachers and related school personnel all over the world, so that we can share much-needed ideas, strategies, and lesson plans as well as all kinds of resources in classroom management and in student discipline. Coordinating our effort worldwide, we can tell each other where to find important resources and information. If you administer a teaching blog or have created educational resources to facilitate our job, you are welcome to share them here. As long as they contribute to education, we want to know of your business. Teachers with questions, post them here; mentors and seasoned teachers, your valuable experience and unique perspective matter to us, so make your voices heard. Because isolated, we teachers are imaginative, resourceful and resilient, but connected, connected we are imaginative, resourceful, resilient AND powerful. To join us, click on, “We Teach the World.”

What is Learned Helplessness?

Learned helplessness is the belief that our own behavior does not control outcomes or results. For example, a child that believes she is in charge of the outcome thinks, “If I study hard for this test, I’ll get a good grade,” but a learned helpless child thinks, “No matter how hard I study for this test, I’ll always get a bad grade.” In school, learned helplessness relates to poor grades and underachievement, and to behavior difficulties. Students who are repeatedly exposed to school failure; for example, children with a learning disability, are particularly prone to develop learned helplessness. As a result of repeated academic failure, learned helpless children doubt their own abilities and doubt that they can do anything to overcome their school difficulties. As a consequence, they decrease their effort, particularly when facing difficult tasks, which leads to more school failure and learned helplessness.

On my 6-page article, When Children Fail in School: What Teachers and Parents Need to Know about Learned Helplessness, I discuss in-depth this very important topic, including a comprehensive list of characteristics of learned helpless children. The optimistic and pessimistic explanatory styles, as introduced by Seligman et al., are discussed. The article also explores the importance of strategy retraining, attribution retraining, and the belief that strategic effort increases ability and skills; all instrumental in helping children overcome learned helplessness. To read this article in full, click here.


A Call to All Teachers:


Proudly announcing our new group for educators worldwide, “We Teach the World.” Our aim is to connect teachers and related school personnel all over the world, so that we can share much-needed ideas, strategies, and lesson plans as well as all kinds of resources in classroom management and in student discipline. Coordinating our effort worldwide, we can tell each other where to find important resources and information. If you administer a teaching blog or have created educational resources to facilitate our job, you are welcome to share them here. As long as they contribute to education, we want to know of your business. Teachers with questions, post them here; mentors and seasoned teachers, your valuable experience and unique perspective matter to us, so make your voices heard. Because isolated, we teachers are imaginative, resourceful and resilient, but connected, connected we are imaginative, resourceful, resilient AND powerful. To join us, click on, “We Teach the World.”

Make Your Words Count: Encouraging Statements to Focus Children on Effort

Encouraging words are words that aim at building children’s self-confidence or trust in their own abilities to master a skill and to solve their own problems. Children need to understand that it is okay to make mistakes; trial and error are part of the learning process, and this is how we master new and challenging skills. Parents and teachers can encourage children to remain optimistic and positive in their ability to learn new skills or to improve current skills. When the child makes a mistake, simply shifting his/her focus from failure (problem-oriented) to hopefulness (solution-oriented) can do wonders in improving the child’s attitude and self-confidence. We can help children see personal or academic errors and mistakes as both external (not as a personality trait or defining who they are) and controllable; that is, something that it can be improved through effort and using specific learning strategies. We help children focus on effort by consistently noticing and appreciating the things they do to better themselves.
Parents and teachers also encourage children by helping them shift the focus away from causes (why the problem is happening) and toward goals, or where they are headed; that is, focusing children on what they want and what they need to do (steps) to get what they want. Our encouraging role resembles the role of a sports coach, with as little criticism as possible but with adequate supervision, detailed directions (the how to or procedure), and plenty of support. Like a sports coach, we identify and build on the child’s strengths (e.g. the child has a good sense of humor, he is good with numbers, is organized, and has a good memory), helping the child identify how that unique set of strengths can help in acquiring a specific skill or in reaching a particular goal. Examples of encouraging statements that focus children on effort are:
  • That’s a great effort. Don’t worry about the small mistake.
  • Keep trying. I know you can work this frustrating problem out.
  • I know you will figure out a good way to do this next time.
  • Keep at it; I know you will figure this out. Do you want my help?
  • It is okay to make mistakes, we all do. What do you think you learned from it?


A Call to All Teachers:

Proudly announcing our new group for educators worldwide, “We Teach the World.” Our aim is to connect teachers and related school personnel all over the world, so that we can share much-needed ideas, strategies, and lesson plans as well as all kinds of resources in classroom management and in student discipline. Coordinating our effort worldwide, we can tell each other where to find important resources and information. If you administer a teaching blog or have created educational resources to facilitate our job, you are welcome to share them here. As long as they contribute to education, we want to know of your business. Teachers with questions, post them here; mentors and seasoned teachers, your valuable experience and unique perspective matter to us, so make your voices heard. Because isolated, we teachers are imaginative, resourceful and resilient, but connected, connected we are imaginative, resourceful, resilient AND powerful. To join us, click on, “We Teach the World.”

Effort Praise: A Motivational Strategy for Reluctant and Apathetic Students

Parents, teachers and tutors know well that apathetic and unmotivated children represent a problem of almost epidemic proportions in our classrooms, in particular, at the highest-grade levels. The most important question to answer is what a teacher or a tutor can do to motivate a reluctant, apathetic, and/or helpless learner. This is no simple question with an easy answer. One motivational strategy that can help is the use of effort praise. In few words, this is how this strategy works:

Minimize the child’s mistakes and praise his effort. Help the child understand that errors and mistakes are part of the learning process, and they are necessary so that learning can take place. It is important that adults pay attention to small changes, so that we can praise those first signs that indicate movement toward the child’s goal (for instance, when we see the child focused and completing the task). Some examples of effort praise are:
  • Your math is improving every day.
  • I’m really glad that you _____.
  • You are really concentrating today.
  • The important thing is that you tried your best.
  • I admire how much effort you put on this essay.
  • This is the neatest job I have seen you doing.
  • I love seeing you doing your class work.

Focus on strengths and assets rather than on weaknesses and errors. We can praise the part of the task that the child has already gotten right, minimize errors, and then we tell the child what she needs to do (the steps and strategies) to complete her task successfully.

Additional Guidelines:
  1. Make sure the child clearly sees the connection between his own effort and school success. Children who understand this important effort-achievement connection are more likely to respond to difficult tasks and failure with less stress, less frustration and more positive expectations about the outcome of the event.
  2. Make sure that you define effort correctly, telling the child that effort is spending effective and strategic time on the learning task. Just trying harder or wasting time doing random activities that are not working is not effective effort. Effective and strategic effort focuses on using learning strategies and procedures, that is, trying hard in a particular way is what leads to success. When the strategy or procedure that the child is using is not working, we tell him or her to try a different strategy or procedure. Teaching children to make strategic effort attributions helps them see failure and academic difficulties as problem solving situations in which the search for a better strategy to use becomes the focus. When we train an apathetic, unmotivated, and/or helpless student in how to use strategic effort attributions, we can weaken the negative perception that lack of ability is what causes failure (e.g. “I’m dumb! I’ll never learn this!”); most learning problems are rooted in either children not using learning strategies, or applying an inefficient learning strategy for the specific skill that they are learning. The child simply needs to find a better learning strategy to solve that particular problem.
  3. Teach the child to see academic errors and mistakes as her cue to change the learning strategy she is currently using.
  4. Explicitly tell and show the child how to manage failure and setbacks in a constructive and strategic way, for example, you can say, “This is not working. What is another way that you can do this?” Alternatively, say, “What is another strategy that you can use?”
To better understand the full impact of low motivation on learning, you can read my article, How Children Learn: Understanding Motivation


A Call to All Teachers:


Proudly announcing our new group for educators worldwide, “We Teach the World.” Our aim is to connect teachers and related school personnel all over the world, so that we can share much-needed ideas, strategies, and lesson plans as well as all kinds of resources in classroom management and in student discipline. Coordinating our effort worldwide, we can tell each other where to find important resources and information. If you administer a teaching blog or have created educational resources to facilitate our job, you are welcome to share them here. As long as they contribute to education, we want to know of your business. Teachers with questions, post them here; mentors and seasoned teachers, your valuable experience and unique perspective matter to us, so make your voices heard. Because isolated, we teachers are imaginative, resourceful and resilient, but connected, connected we are imaginative, resourceful, resilient AND powerful. To join us, click on, “We Teach the World.”

Thursday, December 10, 2015

Teaching Strategies for Learned Helpless Students

These guidelines were selected from my 9-page article, “When Children Fail in School Part Two: Teaching Strategies for Learned Helpless Students.” To read the complete article, click on the link at the bottom.
  • Make sure the child clearly sees the connection between his own effort and school success. Children who perceive this connection are more likely to respond to difficult tasks and failure with less frustration and with positive expectations about the outcome of the event.
  • Make sure that you define effort correctly, telling the student that effort is spending effective and strategic time on the learning task. Just trying harder or spending time doing random activities that are not working is not effective effort. Effective and strategic effort focuses on using learning strategies and procedures, that is, trying hard in a particular way is what leads to success. When the strategy or procedure that the child is using is not working, we tell him or her to try a different strategy or procedure. Teaching children to make strategic effort attributions help them see failure and academic difficulties as problem solving situations in which the search for a better strategy to use becomes their focus. When we teach an apathetic, unmotivated, and/or helpless student in using strategic effort attributions, we can weaken the child’s perception that his lack of ability is the problem, helping the child understand that the problem lies in using an ineffective learning strategy or procedure. The child simply needs to find a better strategy to solve that particular problem.
  • Teach the child to see academic errors and mistakes as her cue to change the learning strategy she is using.
  • Model to the student how to manage failure and setbacks in a constructive and strategic way, for example, you can say, “This is not working. What is another way that I can do this?” Alternatively, you can say, “What is another strategy that I can try?”
To read the complete article, click here.

A Call to All Teachers:


Proudly announcing our new group for educators worldwide, “We Teach the World.” Our aim is to connect teachers and related school personnel all over the world, so that we can share much-needed ideas, strategies, and lesson plans as well as all kinds of resources in classroom management and in student discipline. Coordinating our effort worldwide, we can tell each other where to find important resources and information. If you administer a teaching blog or have created educational resources to facilitate our job, you are welcome to share them here. As long as they contribute to education, we want to know of your business. Teachers with questions, post them here; mentors and seasoned teachers, your valuable experience and unique perspective matter to us, so make your voices heard. Because isolated, we teachers are imaginative, resourceful and resilient, but connected, connected we are imaginative, resourceful, resilient AND powerful. To join us, click on, “We Teach the World.

Adaptations and Modifications to Help Students with Attention Problems

The following study adaptations or modified learning strategies are ideally suited for children having difficulty paying attention to tasks and completing assignments. Teachers can easily adapt these strategies for classroom use or to use with several students at a time.
  1. Before the child begins to work on a task, have him identify and list the steps for completing it, including a time estimate both for each step and for the whole task. You can write the estimates on a piece of paper or index card to prompt the child when the time to complete each step is near.
  2. Write the list of steps on an index card (a key word or a key phrase for each step is enough), and have the child write the same list on a notepad or an index card. As the child completes each step, she crosses out the step off the list.
  3. Provide a timer or stopwatch for the child to monitor her work time.
  4. Give the child ample warning when an activity is about to change. For example, you can say, “You have five more minutes of work time left. In five minutes, we move to _____.”
  5. Make sure the child knows exactly how long he has to work on the task. Set up benchmarks like, “Pages 12 and 13 should be completed by 11:15.”
  6. Read the directions aloud, and have the child follow along, underlining or highlighting the most important information, explanations, key words, and/or steps. In addition, the child writes the correct number above each step, e.g. 1, 2, and 3.
  7. Break a longer task into several smaller and easier tasks. For example, using index cards or a notepad, the child writes down each smaller step required to complete the assignment. The child works on one index card or step at a time, keeping all the other index cards out of sight. As the child completes each step, he throws away the card for that step, moving to the next index card.
  8. Give reduced assignments to your inattentive child, so that he can complete work independently and for longer time. For example, the inattentive child completes only five problems of the twenty problems on a page, or completes the odd numbered problems but not the even numbered problems.
  9. You can reduce the amount of visual material that the child needs to pay attention to by drawing a circle around or tracing with your finger (framing) the important information on the chart or diagram. Teach the child to consistently draw circles around and/or highlight important visual information.
  10. When you are handling an inattentive and unfocused child, keep your expectations humble and real. One task left without completion is not a big deal when the child managed to finish two other tasks. The two completed tasks, however, are a big deal; acknowledge the child’s success and reward her effort.
On my 11-page article, Helping the Unfocused Mind: Teaching Strategies for Students Having Difficulty Getting and Maintaining Attention, the important issue of attention problems in schools, including a wide variety of strategies, is explored in full. To read the article, click here.


A Call to All Teachers:


Proudly announcing our new group for educators worldwide, “We Teach the World.” Our aim is to connect teachers and related school personnel all over the world, so that we can share much-needed ideas, strategies, and lesson plans as well as all kinds of resources in classroom management and in student discipline. Coordinating our effort worldwide, we can tell each other where to find important resources and information. If you administer a teaching blog or have created educational resources to facilitate our job, you are welcome to share them here. As long as they contribute to education, we want to know of your business. Teachers with questions, post them here; mentors and seasoned teachers, your valuable experience and unique perspective matter to us, so make your voices heard. Because isolated, we teachers are imaginative, resourceful and resilient, but connected, connected we are imaginative, resourceful, resilient AND powerful. To join us, click on, “We Teach the World.”

Tuesday, December 8, 2015

Behavior Management Tip 4: Winning Child Compliance with Positive Language

A popular belief in interactional and language-based discipline is that, when adults state any direction or command given to a child using positive wording, the child complies faster (and easier) than when we use negative language, i.e. negative directions or a negative command. Typically crowded with harsh terms and spoiled with negative presuppositions about the child’s character or identity, a negative direction tells the child what not to do, for example, “Don’t run on the hall” or “Don’t bang on the table. What’s wrong with you today?!” (Negative presupposition: “There’s something wrong with you.”) In the same category we find the “Stop” command, for example, saying, “Stop yelling! I’m getting a headache!” (Negative presupposition: “You are giving me a headache.”) or “Shut up! I don’t want to hear another sound coming out of your mouth!” (Negative presupposition: “Your sounds are annoying.”) Positive directions, on the other hand, give the child an alternative of what to do instead of the unruly behavior; simply put, a positive direction redirects the child toward a more appropriate, acceptable behavior or a better behavior. As an added benefit, positive directions are “cleaner” (no demeaning terms) and free of contamination (free of harmful presuppositions). Here is an example:

 Teacher: “Making noises at the table interrupts the other students. If you need to make noises, I want you (taking ownership of your message) to move quietly (command) to the back of the room and bang this toy (plush dog, command) for five minutes, (command), so that, when you feel better (powerful presupposition: “You will feel better”), you can return to the table (command).”

A parent would say to her child something like this: “I have a headache and loud noises make me feel worse (taking ownership of your message). I would like for you (taking ownership and also, softening your message) to go to your room (command) and play with your Legos (command) for one hour(command).”

Notice how in both statements, the adult remained in charge, and steadily, told the child, very specifically, what the child should be doing instead.



ALL BEHAVIOR IS COMMUNICATION
How to Give Feedback, Criticism, and Corrections that Improve Behavior

To preview this book on Amazon, click here.


A Call to All Teachers:

Proudly announcing our new group for educators worldwide, “We Teach the World.” Our aim is to connect teachers and related school personnel all over the world, so that we can share much-needed ideas, strategies, and lesson plans as well as all kinds of resources in classroom management and in student discipline. Coordinating our effort worldwide, we can tell each other where to find important resources and information. If you administer a teaching blog or have created educational resources to facilitate our job, you are welcome to share them here. As long as they contribute to education, we want to know of your business. Teachers with questions, post them here; mentors and seasoned teachers, your valuable experience and unique perspective matter to us, so make your voices heard. Because isolated, we teachers are imaginative, resourceful and resilient, but connected, connected we are imaginative, resourceful, resilient AND powerful. To join us, click on, “We Teach the World.”

Sunday, December 6, 2015

How to Have a Nicer, Friendlier Class/Smart Classroom Management

To read this original blog spot by author Michael Linsin, click here.


A Call to All Teachers:


Proudly announcing our new group for educators worldwide, “We Teach the World.” Our aim is to connect teachers and related school personnel all over the world, so that we can share much-needed ideas, strategies, and lesson plans as well as all kinds of resources in classroom management and in student discipline. Coordinating our effort worldwide, we can tell each other where to find important resources and information. If you administer a teaching blog or have created educational resources to facilitate our job, you are welcome to share them here. As long as they contribute to education, we want to know of your business. Teachers with questions, post them here; mentors and seasoned teachers, your valuable experience and unique perspective matter to us, so make your voices heard. Because isolated, we teachers are imaginative, resourceful and resilient, but connected, connected we are imaginative, resourceful, resilient AND powerful. To join us, click on, “We Teach the World.”

Goals Worksheet for Social & Emotional Development | Edutopia

Click on the link to download this reproducible:

Goals Worksheet for Social & Emotional Development | Edutopia


A Call to All Teachers:


Proudly announcing our new group for educators worldwide, “We Teach the World.” Our aim is to connect teachers and related school personnel all over the world, so that we can share much-needed ideas, strategies, and lesson plans as well as all kinds of resources in classroom management and in student discipline. Coordinating our effort worldwide, we can tell each other where to find important resources and information. If you administer a teaching blog or have created educational resources to facilitate our job, you are welcome to share them here. As long as they contribute to education, we want to know of your business. Teachers with questions, post them here; mentors and seasoned teachers, your valuable experience and unique perspective matter to us, so make your voices heard. Because isolated, we teachers are imaginative, resourceful and resilient, but connected, connected we are imaginative, resourceful, resilient AND powerful. To join us, click on, “We Teach the World.”

Thursday, December 3, 2015

Disciplining Noncompliant Children

Here are some “tricks of the trade” in language-based discipline so that teachers and parents get better results when disciplining angry and/or noncompliant children.

1.     Lower Your Voice
When disciplining, reduce the tone of your voice and speak s-l-o-w-e-r. This helps you both in projecting self-confidence and in remaining calm. Louder and angrier statements, on the other hand, conceal the message beneath all the noise and harsh words that accompany them.

2.     Stay in the Present
Do not dwell on past behavior, or something that happened weeks earlier. Correct only behavior that is happening here and now.

3.     Own Your Message
Change “You-messages” to “I-messages.” For example, instead of saying, “You are such a potty mouth!” say, “I feel uneasy because I don’t like being cursed.”

4.     Challenge the Child
When you address misbehavior, keep it simple but keep it challenging. The simplest and most challenging message that we can deliver to a child with recurrent behavior problems is,Connect with the best in you.” Focus the child on her best qualities and in how those qualities can help in strengthening weaker performance.

5.     Accentuate and Transfer Positive Behavior
Build on what the child is doing well already, concentrating in spreading out positive behavior to weaker areas of performance. Simply put, let the child know that “If you can do it here, you can do it there.”

6.     Use Temporal Language
Use language that communicates your expectation that the negative behavior is going to change; it is just a matter of when (time). For example, you can say, “In the next few days, when you are no longer feeling angry about this…”

7.     “Close” the Negative Behavior
Conversely, talk about negative behaviors as if they were something from a distant past, even when the behavior happened just five minutes earlier. Always talk about negative behaviors using the past tense of verbs.

8.     “Open” the Child to the Possibility of Better Behavior
At the same time that you are talking about misbehavior as something from the past, use verbs in the future tense to build positive expectations and to “open” the child’s mind (to make the child receptive) to more positive expectations. Talk about how things are going to be (how the behavior is going to improve) sometimes in the future, but without specifying when. Keep “change” unstated and indefinite, so that it comes when the child feels ready for it.

9.     Always Separate the Actor (Child) from the Action (Behavior)
Make sure that the child knows that although he does his behavior, he is not the behavior. Replace messages that label the child’s character (e.g. “You are selfish”) with messages that label actions (e.g., “You are acting in a selfish way.”) Simply put, label the behavior, not the student.

10.  Talk About Specific Actions
Use behavior specific language, describing what you see, hear, and can touch. Steer clear from inferences, interpretations, and judgments of the behavior. You can start a discussion about a particular behavior saying something like, “Let us talk about the way you handled this situation with Kevin.”

11.  Focus on the Child’s Goal, Not on Your Goal
Your messages to the child should be more about “Be the best you can be” (the child’s goal), and less about “Be the way I want you to be” (your goal).

12.  Focus the Child on the Goal of Self-Discipline
Discipline is more effective and long-lasting when it comes from within (self-discipline), rather than being imposed by an external source. Help the child identify a long-term goal, breaking it down into easier and more manageable steps (short-term goals), so that the child experiences success in smaller increments. Nothing builds success like success; with the long-term goal in mind, strive for self-discipline.

13.   Give Choices to the Child
Ensure that the child takes responsibility for the behavior choices she makes. The child needs to understand both that behavior is her choice and that choices have consequences; and these consequences can be either positive or negative. Once the child understands behavior as a choice, you can start building a lesson for life: “Because I am the one responsible for the choices I make, I’m the only person responsible for the things I do.”

Related Reading...



THE HEART OF DISCIPLINING- FOR PARENTS: 
Understanding and Delivering Feedback, Criticism, and Corrections that Teach Positive Behavior
To preview this book on Amazon, click here.


A Call to All Teachers:

Proudly announcing our new group for educators worldwide, “We Teach the World.” Our aim is to connect teachers and related school personnel all over the world, so that we can share much-needed ideas, strategies, and lesson plans as well as all kinds of resources in classroom management and in student discipline. Coordinating our effort worldwide, we can tell each other where to find important resources and information. If you administer a teaching blog or have created educational resources to facilitate our job, you are welcome to share them here. As long as they contribute to education, we want to know of your business. Teachers with questions, post them here; mentors and seasoned teachers, your valuable experience and unique perspective matter to us, so make your voices heard. Because isolated, we teachers are imaginative, resourceful and resilient, but connected, connected we are imaginative, resourceful, resilient AND powerful. To join us, click on, “We Teach the World.”

Saturday, November 28, 2015

Developing Teachers' Social and Emotional Skills | Edutopia

Click on the link to read article:

Developing Teachers' Social and Emotional Skills | Edutopia


A Call to All Teachers:


Proudly announcing our new group for educators worldwide, “We Teach the World.” Our aim is to connect teachers and related school personnel all over the world, so that we can share much-needed ideas, strategies, and lesson plans as well as all kinds of resources in classroom management and in student discipline. Coordinating our effort worldwide, we can tell each other where to find important resources and information. If you administer a teaching blog or have created educational resources to facilitate our job, you are welcome to share them here. As long as they contribute to education, we want to know of your business. Teachers with questions, post them here; mentors and seasoned teachers, your valuable experience and unique perspective matter to us, so make your voices heard. Because isolated, we teachers are imaginative, resourceful and resilient, but connected, connected we are imaginative, resourceful, resilient AND powerful. To join us, click on, “We Teach the World.”

Sunday, November 22, 2015

Classroom Behavioural Strategies and Interventions/edu.gov.mb

Click on title to read article.
 'via Blog this'


A Call to All Teachers:


Proudly announcing our new group for educators worldwide, “We Teach the World.” Our aim is to connect teachers and related school personnel all over the world, so that we can share much-needed ideas, strategies, and lesson plans as well as all kinds of resources in classroom management and in student discipline. Coordinating our effort worldwide, we can tell each other where to find important resources and information. If you administer a teaching blog or have created educational resources to facilitate our job, you are welcome to share them here. As long as they contribute to education, we want to know of your business. Teachers with questions, post them here; mentors and seasoned teachers, your valuable experience and unique perspective matter to us, so make your voices heard. Because isolated, we teachers are imaginative, resourceful and resilient, but connected, connected we are imaginative, resourceful, resilient AND powerful. To join us, click on, “We Teach the World.”

Thursday, November 19, 2015

Behavior and Classroom Management-about.com

Click on link to read article:

Behavior and Classroom Management'via Blog this'


A Call to All Teachers:


Proudly announcing our new group for educators worldwide, “We Teach the World.” Our aim is to connect teachers and related school personnel all over the world, so that we can share much-needed ideas, strategies, and lesson plans as well as all kinds of resources in classroom management and in student discipline. Coordinating our effort worldwide, we can tell each other where to find important resources and information. If you administer a teaching blog or have created educational resources to facilitate our job, you are welcome to share them here. As long as they contribute to education, we want to know of your business. Teachers with questions, post them here; mentors and seasoned teachers, your valuable experience and unique perspective matter to us, so make your voices heard. Because isolated, we teachers are imaginative, resourceful and resilient, but connected, connected we are imaginative, resourceful, resilient AND powerful. To join us, click on, “We Teach the World.”

Tuesday, November 17, 2015

Discipline Problems, Unruly Behavior Seriously Threatening Student Achievement-PUBLICAGENDA.ORG

Click on link to read article:

PUBLICAGENDA.ORG - Discipline Problems, Unruly Behavior Seriously Threatening Student Achievement:

'via Blog this'


A Call to All Teachers:


Proudly announcing our new group for educators worldwide, “We Teach the World.” Our aim is to connect teachers and related school personnel all over the world, so that we can share much-needed ideas, strategies, and lesson plans as well as all kinds of resources in classroom management and in student discipline. Coordinating our effort worldwide, we can tell each other where to find important resources and information. If you administer a teaching blog or have created educational resources to facilitate our job, you are welcome to share them here. As long as they contribute to education, we want to know of your business. Teachers with questions, post them here; mentors and seasoned teachers, your valuable experience and unique perspective matter to us, so make your voices heard. Because isolated, we teachers are imaginative, resourceful and resilient, but connected, connected we are imaginative, resourceful, resilient AND powerful. To join us, click on, “We Teach the World.”

Teacher Behavioral Strategies: A Menu | Intervention Central

Click on link to read article:

Teacher Behavioral Strategies: A Menu | Intervention Central:

'via Blog this'


A Call to All Teachers:


Proudly announcing our new group for educators worldwide, “We Teach the World.” Our aim is to connect teachers and related school personnel all over the world, so that we can share much-needed ideas, strategies, and lesson plans as well as all kinds of resources in classroom management and in student discipline. Coordinating our effort worldwide, we can tell each other where to find important resources and information. If you administer a teaching blog or have created educational resources to facilitate our job, you are welcome to share them here. As long as they contribute to education, we want to know of your business. Teachers with questions, post them here; mentors and seasoned teachers, your valuable experience and unique perspective matter to us, so make your voices heard. Because isolated, we teachers are imaginative, resourceful and resilient, but connected, connected we are imaginative, resourceful, resilient AND powerful. To join us, click on, “We Teach the World.”

Six Strategies for Helping Students with Behavior Challenges - Citizen Schools

To read article, click on link:

Six Strategies for Helping Students with Behavior Challenges - Citizen Schools:

'via Blog this'


A Call to All Teachers:


Proudly announcing our new group for educators worldwide, “We Teach the World.” Our aim is to connect teachers and related school personnel all over the world, so that we can share much-needed ideas, strategies, and lesson plans as well as all kinds of resources in classroom management and in student discipline. Coordinating our effort worldwide, we can tell each other where to find important resources and information. If you administer a teaching blog or have created educational resources to facilitate our job, you are welcome to share them here. As long as they contribute to education, we want to know of your business. Teachers with questions, post them here; mentors and seasoned teachers, your valuable experience and unique perspective matter to us, so make your voices heard. Because isolated, we teachers are imaginative, resourceful and resilient, but connected, connected we are imaginative, resourceful, resilient AND powerful. To join us, click on, “We Teach the World.”